Skip to content
  • Print

Important Information for Parents and Families

Pacific Header

Vice President of Student Life Patrick Day's Letter to Students:

Date:    April 7, 2017
To:       University of the Pacific Students
From:  Patrick K. Day, Vice President for Student Life
Re.:      Important information regarding mumps

I wanted to let you know that two Pacific students on the Stockton Campus were recently diagnosed with mumps and are recovering. A limited number of other students have presented symptoms and are being tested.   We are working closely with San Joaquin County Public Health Services to ensure the affected students receive care, including the measles-mumps-rubella (MMR) vaccine booster, which is recommended to prevent the spread of the disease. Mumps is a contagious viral disease and is spread by coughing, sneezing or close contact with an infected person. Mumps typically starts 12-25 days after exposure with a few days of fever, headache, muscle aches, tiredness, and loss of appetite, and is followed by swelling of salivary glands near the jaw and ears. For more information about mumps, see the frequently asked questions here, or visit the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention website on mumps.   Pacific Health Services and San Joaquin County Public Health Services will provide the MMR vaccine booster to students most likely to have been exposed to the affected students to prevent the spread of the disease. The university will be contacting those students about when and where to receive the vaccine booster.

If you develop symptoms of mumps, or have questions, please contact Pacific Health Services at 209.946.2315 ext. 1, or your primary care provider.   There are several things you can do to help prevent spreading the virus to others:

  • Cover your mouth and nose with a tissue when you cough or sneeze, and put your used tissue in the trash can.  If you don't have a tissue, cough or sneeze into your upper sleeve or elbow, not your hands.
  • Wash hands well and often with soap.
  • Don't share drinks or eating utensils.
  • Regularly clean surfaces that are frequently touched (such as phones, doorknobs, tables, counters) with soap and water or with cleaning wipes.
  • Stay home from school or work for five days after your glands begin to swell, and try not to have close contact with other people who live in your house.
  • Minimize close contact with other people, especially babies, pregnant women and people with weakened immune systems who cannot be vaccinated.

Several colleges and universities around the country are also seeing cases of mumps. While this is troubling, University of the Pacific will work to ensure students on our campuses receive the care that they need to continue meeting their educational goals. We will continue to monitor the situation and keep you apprised as needed.

Sincerely,

Patrick K. Day
Vice President for Student Life

_________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Vice President of Student Life Patrick Day's Letter to Faculty & Staff

Date:    April 7, 2017

To:       University of the Pacific Faculty and Staff

From:  Maria Pallavicini, Provost and Executive Vice President for Academic Affairs             Patrick K. Day, Vice President for Student Life Re.:      Important information regarding mumps We wanted to apprise you of the communication below just sent to students notifying them that two of their fellow students on the Stockton campus have been diagnosed with mumps. The two students are recovering, and there are a limited number of other students who have presented symptoms and are being tested. We are coordinating with San Joaquin County Public Health Services to care for our students, including ordering doses of the measles-mumps-rubella (MMR) vaccine booster, which is the recommended course to prevent the spread of the disease. This strain of mumps has hit colleges and universities for much of the past decade, according to San Joaquin County Public Health Services officials, and tends to affect primarily students. However, if you have questions or you begin to experience symptoms of mumps, which include fever, headache, muscle aches, tiredness, and loss of appetite, followed by swelling of salivary glands near the jaw and ears, please immediately contact your primary care provider for advice and possibly a dose of the MMR vaccine booster, even if you have been given the vaccine before. For more information about mumps, see the frequently asked questions here, or visit the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention website on mumps.

For your information, the communication to students is below. We will continue to monitor the situation and update you as necessary.

Date:    April 7, 2017
To:       University of the Pacific Students
From:  Patrick K. Day, Vice President for Student Life
Re.:      Important information regarding mumps I wanted to let you know that two Pacific students on the Stockton Campus were recently diagnosed with mumps and are recovering. A limited number of other students have presented symptoms and are being tested.   We are working closely with San Joaquin County Public Health Services to ensure the affected students receive care, including the measles-mumps-rubella (MMR) vaccine booster, which is recommended to prevent the spread of the disease. Mumps is a contagious viral disease and is spread by coughing, sneezing or close contact with an infected person. Mumps typically starts 12-25 days after exposure with a few days of fever, headache, muscle aches, tiredness, and loss of appetite, and is followed by swelling of salivary glands near the jaw and ears. For more information about mumps, see the frequently asked questions here, or visit the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention website on mumps.   Pacific Health Services and San Joaquin County Public Health Services will provide the MMR vaccine booster to students most likely to have been exposed to the affected students to prevent the spread of the disease. The university will be contacting those students about when and where to receive the vaccine booster.

If you develop symptoms of mumps, or have questions, please contact Pacific Health Services at 209.946.2315 ext. 1, or your primary care provider.   There are several things you can do to help prevent spreading the virus to others:

  • Cover your mouth and nose with a tissue when you cough or sneeze, and put your used tissue in the trash can.  If you don't have a tissue, cough or sneeze into your upper sleeve or elbow, not your hands.
  • Wash hands well and often with soap.
  • Don't share drinks or eating utensils.
  • Regularly clean surfaces that are frequently touched (such as phones, doorknobs, tables, counters) with soap and water or with cleaning wipes.
  • Stay home from school or work for five days after your glands begin to swell, and try not to have close contact with other people who live in your house.
  • Minimize close contact with other people, especially babies, pregnant women and people with weakened immune systems who cannot be vaccinated.

Several colleges and universities around the country are also seeing cases of mumps. While this is troubling, University of the Pacific will work to ensure students on our campuses receive the care that they need to continue meeting their educational goals. We will continue to monitor the situation and keep you apprised as needed.

Sincerely,

Patrick K. Day
Vice President for Student Life